GS/6 Propane Detector

GS6

Detect remote leaks and auto- matically shut off your propane supply.

 


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GS/6 Operation and Testing

Wiring & Installation Tips for Your GS/6 Propane Detector


wiring diagram for GS6 propane leak detector showing solenoid valve, propane detector, 2 propane sensors and 12 VDC battery

Installation

Determine where you want your detector and drill 1/2"D hole through your installation surface in the center of the detector location, (surface mount only). If you're installing the flush mount unit follow the instructions on the supplied template.

GS/6 Wiring

Run 2 power lines (18 or 16 guage) from the 12 volt battery to the installation location, (red to positive via an in-line 2 Amp fuse, and black to negative). Feed sensor cable(s) and power lines through from behind. and plug the sensor connector(s) into the socket. Connect power to the leads from the detector, (red to positive, black to negative). Wires may be soldered or splice crimped. Connections must be insulated.

Connecting the solenoid valve

Install the propane valve on the low pressure side of the regulator with the feed line from the propane tank connected to the "IN" port. Connect the distribution line to the other port. Connect each yellow lead on the detector to a length of 16 or 18 gauge wire long enough to reach the solenoid valve. Screw the detector down to your dash or console.

Optional Sensors

An extra remote sensor can be added to allow detection of leaks in a second compartment. Ask your dealer for details.

Power Requirements

GS/6 with 1 sensor: 130mA; optional second sensor adds 85mA; when the solenoid is energized it adds 130mA. After 30 seconds the intensity of the back lighting decreases to conserve energy and remains dimmed until there is an alarm or you touch any button on the keypad.

Sensor Installation tips

Since propane is heavier than air you want to choose a location for the sensor where propane is likely to accumulate. Generally, this is within 6" of the floor where a leak is likely to occur - near the propane supply or propane appliances.

For instance, if your propane appliances are installed in cabinets that drain into the bilge of your boat, the bilge would be a good location to monitor. If the cabinets are sealed with no drainage into the bilge, ckeck to see if the appliance can drain into the cabinet interior or if the gas would cascade over the cabinet to the floor. If it drains to the cabinet interior, this would be a good location for the sensor. If it cascades over the cabinet the kick plate under the cabinet would be a good location. If you want to cover both possibilities, consider putting a vent in the kick plate that would allow propane to flow out of the cabinet interior. This would allow you to detect a leak in either location with the sensor head installed on the outside of the cabinet kick plate.

In an RV, the step well is usually the lowest position in the vehicle. If your RV doesn't have a step well the kick plate under your kitchen appliances would be a good location to monitor. As suggested above, consider putting a vent in the kick plate that would allow propane to flow out of the cabinet interior. This would allow you to detect a leak in either location with the sensor head installed on the outside of the cabinet kick plate.

Plug the sensor connector into the socket lead in the back of the detector. Run the sensor cable(s) from the detector to the remote location(s) you want to monitor.